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Spring cleaning

Dr. Paul
Mother and son vacuuming the house.

Spring is here! The trees are leafing out with their palette of green. Spring flowers are blooming everywhere and fruit trees are wearing their multi-colored blossoms. It’s nature’s moment of renewal and celebration. Read more about Spring cleaning

The value of team sports

Dr. Paul
Team of rowers.

Mary Jean is worried about her 15-year-old daughter, Sarah, who struggles in school. She’s often an indifferent student—her real passion is soccer. She isn’t the best player on the team, but she loves the sport and puts huge effort into every practice. She gets along well with the rest of her team, works hard, always shows up, and doesn't give up when the going gets tough. She listens to her coach. And while she’s a strong competitor, and would love to have more time on the playing field, she doesn't complain when it’s her turn to sit on the bench. Read more about The value of team sports

Becoming the person you hope to be

Dr. Paul
Grandfather teaching grandson to water.

Two months ago, I retired from my job as Director of the Behavioral Health department of The Everett Clinic. I was hired 25 years ago to start the department, and for a quarter of a century I was at the helm. It was a great job. Sure, I had my ups and downs, but I loved having the opportunity to try out different ways of providing a high quality service to our patients. During those years, I also saw patients half-time as a psychologist. I had the privilege of working with many kids in the 1990’s who became adults and then had their own children. Read more about Becoming the person you hope to be

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Fathers and sons

Dr. Paul
Father and son bonding.

On April 1st, my father would have celebrated his 99th birthday.

When he was 87, he learned that he had inoperable lung cancer. When he told me, I was surprised how sad I felt. He had always been relatively healthy—despite having the usual cardiovascular problems of older age. I thought I was prepared for the inevitable. I wasn’t.

As an adult, I always felt distant from my father. We spoke different languages. He was a scientist, a technician, an engineer who lived in the world of facts, symbols, and numbers. I am a psychologist, who lives in the world of people. Read more about Fathers and sons

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Are you a "snow plow" parent?

Dr. Paul
Caucasian family sitting together smiling.

The recent news, about wealthy parents enlisting the help of a “college admissions” company to falsify their children’s college application, has received a great deal of publicity. Frankly, what these parents did was disgusting. Some of the kids had no idea their parents were pulling strings, while I’m sure others knew perfectly well what their parents were up to. Children growing up in wealthy families know all about privilege—getting to the head of the line isn’t a new experience for them. Read more about Are you a "snow plow" parent?

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Reflections on “A star is born”

Dr. Paul
Photo courtesy of Dr. Paul Schoenfeld.

While flying home from a visit with my granddaughters, I saw the recent remake of “A star is born”. It’s a well done film. I had no idea that Lady Gaga (Ally) had such a beautiful voice.  Ally’s rise to stardom, based on good fortune and amazing talent, was heartwarming. But Jackson’s story, is sad, painful, and all too familiar. It’s the story of alcoholism and drug addiction and the rising suicide rate among middle aged adults. It’s a tragedy that touches all of us—either directly or indirectly. Read more about Reflections on “A star is born”

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Functional fitness as we age

Dr. Paul
Senior aged adults being active outdoors.

Growing older brings greater wisdom and perspective. But it also brings aches and pains that come with an aging body. When I get up in the middle of the night for a trip to the bathroom, my body is stiff and tight. I hate to think about what I might look like as I take those first few steps. Read more about Functional fitness as we age

Parents and their adult children

Dr. Paul
Adult son with older father.

It’s tough being a parent—even when your children are fully fledged adults.

For so many years, Moms and Dads are involved in every aspect of their youngsters lives—what they eat, when they go to sleep, what they wear, and what they do. The first 18 years comprise the biggest responsibility a person will ever have. I remember the sense of wonder I felt when we brought our first baby home from the hospital. With that awe came the dawning realization-- I was completely responsible for this helpless being. I knew my life would never be the same. And it wasn't. Read more about Parents and their adult children

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