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Reflections on “A star is born”

Dr. Paul
Photo courtesy of Dr. Paul Schoenfeld.

While flying home from a visit with my granddaughters, I saw the recent remake of “A star is born”. It’s a well done film. I had no idea that Lady Gaga (Ally) had such a beautiful voice.  Ally’s rise to stardom, based on good fortune and amazing talent, was heartwarming. But Jackson’s story, is sad, painful, and all too familiar. It’s the story of alcoholism and drug addiction and the rising suicide rate among middle aged adults. It’s a tragedy that touches all of us—either directly or indirectly. Read more about Reflections on “A star is born”

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Functional fitness as we age

Dr. Paul
Senior aged adults being active outdoors.

Growing older brings greater wisdom and perspective. But it also brings aches and pains that come with an aging body. When I get up in the middle of the night for a trip to the bathroom, my body is stiff and tight. I hate to think about what I might look like as I take those first few steps. Read more about Functional fitness as we age

Parents and their adult children

Dr. Paul
Adult son with older father.

It’s tough being a parent—even when your children are fully fledged adults.

For so many years, Moms and Dads are involved in every aspect of their youngsters lives—what they eat, when they go to sleep, what they wear, and what they do. The first 18 years comprise the biggest responsibility a person will ever have. I remember the sense of wonder I felt when we brought our first baby home from the hospital. With that awe came the dawning realization-- I was completely responsible for this helpless being. I knew my life would never be the same. And it wasn't. Read more about Parents and their adult children

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Can boredom be useful?

Dr. Paul
Woman bored at her desk.

What do you do when you’re bored? In the 19th century, perhaps you went for a long walk by a flowing river or read a book. In the 20th century, maybe you listened to the radio or watched television. Now, in the 21st century, it’s likely that you flip through your Facebook or Instagram feed. What did Charlie have for dinner last night? Where did Louise go on with her husband? Or perhaps you turn on your computer, grab your joystick, and play— “World of Warcraft” with folks in five different countries. Read more about Can boredom be useful?

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Coping with suicide

Boe
Depressed teen looking in the mirror.

Several days ago I sat with a group of adults who lost a colleague to suicide.  As we talked about his death, several of the group started crying. Despite the passage of time, simply talking about him brought waves of grief. But unlike other causes of death, the group also felt guilt. Why didn't they know how depressed he was? Why didn't they see his pain? Read more about Coping with suicide

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Are we too connected?

Dr. Paul
Social media on mobile device.

Social media and smartphones are a vital part of 21st-century life. Even I, a veteran device scoffer, have a Facebook page, a smartphone, and an iPad. (I draw the line with Twitter!) So, I’m part of the internet revolution, like it or not. My social media life is limited to family and close friends, despite friend requests from colleagues, acquaintances, neighbors, and people I hardly know at all. My main social media interest—pictures of my grandchildren. Read more about Are we too connected?

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Is easy better than hard?

Dr. Paul
Take the easy way or the hard way.

I’m old enough to remember when TV dinners were first introduced in the early 1950s. Wow! They were revolutionary at the time. They were packaged in aluminum plates with little compartments for the turkey, peas, mashed potatoes, and desert. Just throw these pre-cooked, frozen meals in the oven, set them on TV trays, and you could eat a piping hot meal while watching television. And no dishes to wash! What could be better? My mom loved them. Read more about Is easy better than hard?

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Letting go

Dr. Paul
Man enjoying a moment to breathe outdoors.

Today, I am sitting on a beautiful beach in Kauai, soaking up the sun, making up for months of darkness and clouds that our Pacific Northwest brings. Bring on the Vitamin D! Getting out during the winter and finding a sunny spot somewhere is a great pick-me-up during a Northwest winter. Read more about Letting go

The Big Five: Making Relationships Work

Dr. Paul
In January, our Behavioral Health team sees a tsunami wave of couples who held it together over the holidays, and now they’re coming in for help. 
 
Love and living under the same roof are intricate. While love tends to be simpler, cohabitation requires constant communication, negotiation, and trust—all of which can be diminished by vast differences in temperament and personality. 
 
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